September 1 Art Opening at Tim’s Wines

Touch of Yellow 5 x 5 (c) Mary Hubley. Available.

Mary Hubley Small Works Exhibit at Tim’s Wines

What: Mary Hubley Artist’s Reception: View new paintings and enjoy free wine tasting and light snacks.

When: Reception: September 1 2017, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Exhibit remains for the month of September. 

Where: Tim’s Wine Market, located on A1A, in St. Augustine’s SeaGrove Town Center.

I’m pleased to invite you to my art opening: my small works exhibit at Tim’s Wine Market. As Tim’s September featured artist of the month, the art opening will be held on September 1, 2017 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. during St. Augustine’s Artwalk event. I’ll be there to introduce my new small paintings collection, while Tim’s Wine Market will pour free wine tastings. The public is invited the opening. The exhibit will remain throughout the month of September.

About Artist Mary Hubley

Mary Hubley is a St. Augustine-based artist who is known for her modern contemporary landscapes. Her style is dramatic with soft edges and a dreamy feel, and moves between semi-abstract to loose impressionist. Much of Mary’s work is completed en plein air – outside, at the edge of local marshes, beaches, and around old St. Augustine’s scenic streets and historic sites. As an award-winning artist, she shows her oil paintings in prominent art galleries throughout the South East.

About Tim’s Wine Market

Tim’s Wine Market is located on A1A, in St. Augustine’s SeaGrove Town Center. Featuring over five hundred selections of quality wine, owners Michael Sally and Kathryn Vaughan offer advice and suggestions in the casual hip atmosphere of this popular local wine shop.

See more about Mary Hubley at www.maryhubley.com

 

Plein Air Season in Florida

By the end of May, Florida gets hot. Week-long organized plein air events aren’t even offered during the hot months, and the most intrepid plein air artists migrate northward to paint in cooler climates. I’ll still sneak out to paint with my local group occasionally. But mostly during the warm months I  morph into a temporary hermit as I duck inside my summer studio cave.

But oh, while the weather was cooler, I created some awesome paintings out in the marshes and in the oldest city.

Flagler Beach Paintout

Water Reflection painting
Still Water Reflections 12 x 12

I was honored to take first place in the Flagler Beach paint out with my painting, “Still Water Reflections.”

It’s always a surprise and delight to receive recognition, as there are many talented painters out there. I kind of float on a cloud for at least a week after a win. This was painted at the side of an alligator-filled marsh, under clear skies and a sizzling sun. Thank goodness for thermos bottles of ice water.

 

 

St. Augustine Paintout

A couple of weeks later, I participated in the St. Augustine plein air paint out. The city was energized by over 50 artists who painted the scenic streets and historic buildings. I managed to finish these three little paintings. The last one, Quiet Pathway, came home with a lovely award from the St. Augustine Art Association.

— Mary Hubley

Too Much Art

Most of my professional artist friends are overwhelmed by their growing amount of art. Even many of the highly successful artists who make a nice living and paint beautiful work suffer from an overabundance of old and unsold work. Artists hoard, stuff into closets, line hallways, 10-deep sitting against the walls in bedrooms, kitchens, dining rooms, and living rooms. Old art, new art, multiple prints/giclees, good, and bad. A predicament.

The solution? Sell it. They try. But many artists’ finest paintings have already been shown and failed to sell.

The problem is the art market has changed. The current generation of art purchasers have grown up in the era of minimalism, Ikea, and Target. They don’t want grandma’s old Hummel collection or the china closet that held it. This is the era of living lightly, buying small homes, and owning less.

A couple of months ago, a local auctioneer told me she’s experiencing a “glut” of original art. She said that she’s getting $25 for the gorgeous paintings that had been in galleries for $4,000. I am not kidding. She said there are too many artists and too few buyers, and the result is too much art.

Is Art Dead?

Art is certainly not dead at the top of the market – the big New York auction houses are selling major pieces at unheard-of highs. And it’s still alive in the middle of the market, but now collectors want investment pieces that create a statement rather than clutter.

What Do Artists Do?

Contemporary Portraits (c) Mary Hubley
Yellow Swimsuit 8 x 10

Successful artists adapt to changing lifestyle trends and sell their best work. And they get creative with the leftovers.

Robert chooses to live in the clutter of his paintings; his estate will have to figure out how to dispose of his paintings after he dies. Emily sells old/bad pieces in garage sales for next to nothing, but wrestles with undercutting her galleries, putting bad pieces out in the market, and devaluing her art. Others donate, gift, and paint over old work.

My Personal Solution: I sell my best work through galleries or online. I keep a few. And then, gulp. I bonfire. Burn and release. Watch the smoke carry away the last sparks of one-time hopeful masterpieces. It’s a sad moment. Then I walk away. Back in the studio, clutter-free, I replace old dogs with new hopefuls.

–Mary Hubley

Small Studies – A Critical Part of the Art Process

It helps to do a quick 30-second 2″ thumbnail sketch before starting a painting. With a quick thumbnail, you can work out the composition, play around with different cropping, and indicate the lights and darks before you ever put paint on the canvas. I refer to my thumbnail sketch often as I start a new painting. It’s a plan. It keeps me grounded. And it speeds up that paint process.

A great thumbnail makes all the difference in creating a successful painting. I don’t get lost as much. It’s become a critical part of my process.

M. Hubley Thumbnail sketches
M. Hubley Thumbnail sketches

Color Studies

But I’ve found over time that I needed more than just a black and white sketch. It just wasn’t enough. I needed to include color in my initial design. Without a good color plan, my larger paintings got lost in grays and browns and mud. These setbacks could take weeks for me to muddle through. So, while I still do pencil sketches for everything, I’ve also started painting small 5×5 color studies in preparation for large-scale work. It saves loads of time, and just like the pencil sketches, they keep me on track.

My new 5 x 5″ small color studies are really full-blown mini paintings, and I’m selling them on my online gallery at Daily Paintworks.

 

 

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New Blog Posts

This is the first post in my very new blog. Here, I’ll be adding new paintings, my process, and things I’m learning and teaching.

But don’t think this is a new thing for me – I’ve actually been in the blogging business for years, on another platform. But I’m finding that it’s now the perfect time to switch from my old “blogger” posting to make it easier and faster to get you the most current updates about my art world. You can still see the oldies – just swing on over to http://marypaintingaday.blogspot.com.

 

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